Sunday, 1 October 2017

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini // Book Review 2017


"I became what I am today at the age of twelve, on a frigid overcast day in the winter of 1975. I remember the precise moment, crouching behind a crumbling mud wall, peeking into the alley near the frozen creek. That was a long time ago, but it's wrong what they say about the past, I've learned, about how you can bury it. Because the past claws its way out. Looking back now, I realise I have been peeking into that deserted alley for the last twenty-six years."



The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini // this book was first published back in 2004 and I remember the hype around it back then - I remember so many people choose this book for their individual study component for Higher English, and it's continued to follow me around since them. As you guys will probably know, I wasn't much of a reader in my teens and it's only a hobby I've started to love recently. I found a copy of this book in the local charity shop for 50p and it was quickly placed on my slowly growing book shelf. I decided to sit down and start reading it last week, after hearing so much about it for years. Sometimes starting a book that is surrounded in hype is good, sometimes it's bad - and in this instance? I can't quite decide...

Anyways, where to start? The books follows the life of twelve year old Amir, as he desperately tries to gain the approval of his father. With the help of his loyal friend, Hassan, Amir decides to win the local kite-fighting tournament, in order to prove to his father that he has the makings of a man. The book is set in 1970s Afghanistan and we continue to learn more about Amir and Hassan as they grow older. Hassan is a low-caste servant who is jeered at in the street, but is always incredibly loyal to his friend Amir. These feelings are not always reciprocal, with Amir constantly feeling jealous of Hassan's natural courage and the place he holds in his father's heart. But that's all I can really say for now. The plot spirals into a series of unfortunate events and we painstakingly follow along, not quite knowing what will happen next. 

This book has very little to do with kite flying. You quickly realise it has some very dark, adult and downright devastating moments that make the hardest of readers want to curl up and cry for hours. But, what else would you expect from Khaled Hosseini? After reading 'A Thousand Splendid Suns', I must have cried for about two weeks! But seriously, the author does love to be a bit 'doom and gloom', with our beloved main characters never truly finding inner happiness or peace or redemption, etc. But I get it, it's realistic and life is not always sweetness and sunshine - and I'm sure that is the point? 

This book is not the happiest and also not for the faint of heart, but I still thoroughly enjoyed it and I am really glad that I finally got round to reading. Will I read it again? I'm not too sure. I never really felt I warmed to many of the characters, BUT AGAIN, that is probably the point? Perhaps it had been too hyped for me, since you know, I've been thinking of reading it since 2004 (!!).... Hmmm it's a funny one, I am still in two minds about it and I know of other people who have had similar thoughts once finishing the book. 

Let me know what you think in the comments below, I would love to know your thoughts about this one. 

More soon,

Helen
x
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3 comments

  1. I read and reviewed this book a couple of weeks ago as well. I totally agree with everything you said. It's a book with an air of sadness and gloom. Like you, I totally enjoyed it but I don't think I'll ever read it again. Great review! xx
    Coco Bella Blog

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  3. Great post, i must buy this book and read it♥

    Beba Gottel

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Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment, I really appreciate it! Helen x

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